Books 

You can find all of Barbara Mitchelhill’s recent books here on this page. Scroll down to see the Damian Drooth series and the Eric series for younger readers. For more information on individual books, click on the titles or pictures. 

 Books for Younger Readers 

No 1 Boy Detective series 
The Eric series - more coming soon! 
No 1 Boy Detective series 

The Case Of The Disappearing Daughter 

Damian Drooth wants to be a REAL DETECTIVE just like Sherlock Holmes. After training himself in the art of crime detection, he finally gets a chance to put his skills to the test when Trixibelle, the daughter of a bigshot film director, is kidnapped. In spite of Mum’s attempts to stop Damian interfering, he is determined to find Trixibelle using his own unorthodox methods. 
Barbara Says: 
When I was eight or nine, I used to pretend I was a detective, just like Damian. My friend, Liz, and I used to watch people walking down our street and we would write 'clues' in our notebooks. I don't remember catching any criminals! 
 
Reviews 
 
The kids in my school are lucky. I have bought the series and after reading them all myself, will add them to the library for creasing, tattering and general over-use. 
 

The Case of the Pop Star’s Wedding 

A superstar singer, Tiger Lilly, is getting married to a footballer. Who better to guard her fabulous wedding pressents than her number one fan, the genius private eye Damian Drooth? Only his mother has serious doubts. But Damian’s amazing brain power and cunning plans win through in the end. He tracks down crooks among the wedding guests and wins Tiger Lilly’s undying admiration. 
Barbara Says: 
When I was eight or nine, I used to pretend I was a detective, just like Damian. My friend, Liz, and I used to watch people walking down our street and we would write 'clues' in our notebooks. I don't remember catching any criminals! 
 
Reviews 
 
The kids in my school are lucky. I have bought the series and after reading them all myself, will add them to the library for creasing, tattering and general over-use. 
 

How To Be A Detective 

Damian Drooth has already solved two cases to great acclaim (and uproarious chaos!), and now he thinks it’s time to pass on his skills. His students want practical experience, so he leads his seven eager trainees through the High Street looking for criminal types, as drawn by Damian himself. 
In the library they hit the jackpot: a blonde lady, with thin lips, removing a book called ‘Loot’. Unfortunately they are prevented from pursuing her then, but the next day they go to a Dog Show, and their hot suspect turns out to be the Judge! Damian overhears her in incriminating conversation, and it’s time to call in the police. However, the police take too long to arrive, and the children have to stage a mock riot in order to prevent her from leaving the scene. Damian Drooth has saved the day, again! 
Barbara Says: 
When I was eight or nine, I used to pretend I was a detective, just like Damian. My friend, Liz, and I used to watch people walking down our street and we would write 'clues' in our notebooks. I don't remember catching any criminals! 
 
Reviews 
 
Barbara Mitchelhill's "How to be a detective" is one of the most dog-eared books in the library. As a volunteer librarian I wanted to understand it's popularity. What better way than reading the aforementioned and then "Damian Drooth Supersleuth Spycatcher" This is another book in the Damian Drooth series. 
 

Spycatcher 

Damian Drooth has already solved three cases to great acclaim (and uproarious chaos!), and now he is passing on his skills to eager pupils. He has decided to help a friendly old man who thinks that his precious and hard-won inventions are being ripped off by an unscrupulous neighbour. Naturally the meeting of Young Inventors is a good place to start – and using all his old skill, he does uncover the bad guy… 
Barbara Says: 
When I was eight or nine, I used to pretend I was a detective, just like Damian. My friend, Liz, and I used to watch people walking down our street and we would write 'clues' in our notebooks. I don't remember catching any criminals! 
 
Reviews 
 
"Spycatcher" is funny. I loved Damian's assumptions about potential criminals. Watch out if your eyes are too close together. The illustrations by Tony Ross add to the characterisation and the story is short enough for even young reluctant readers to finish. 
 

Serious Graffiti 

Damian Drooth is electrified to hear the Headmaster tell everyone off about graffiti in one of the school toilets. He immediately wants to bring all his powers of detection to bear to find the perpetrator – with his class of willing detective apprentices. What with sorting out a handwriting test, and looking for matching paint, he needs all the help he can get! But even Damian isn’t expecting to be accused of the crime himself! Can this phenomenally lucky and outrageously successful investigator extricate himself, and still catch the criminal? Of course he can! 
Barbara Says: 
When I was eight or nine, I used to pretend I was a detective, just like Damian. My friend, Liz, and I used to watch people walking down our street and we would write 'clues' in our notebooks. I don't remember catching any criminals! 
 
Reviews 
 
The kids in my school are lucky. I have bought the series and after reading them all myself, will add them to the library for creasing, tattering and general over-use. 
 

Dog Snatchers 

When a neighbour’s dog goes missing, Damian and his gang of detective apprentices are called in to help find it. First they try posters – but for some reason the newsagent is not happy that they have super-glued their hand-drawn posters to his window. Then they try a decoy. And when that doesn’t work, they resort to ‘rescuing’ dogs that have been left on the street, and taking them back to Damian’s shed. As angry dog owners bear down on them, very luckily the original missing dog turns up! 
Barbara Says: 
When I was eight or nine, I used to pretend I was a detective, just like Damian. My friend, Liz, and I used to watch people walking down our street and we would write 'clues' in our notebooks. I don't remember catching any criminals! 
 
Reviews 
 
My 11 year old, dog-loving daugther lapped this up in an hour, with a few chortles along the way, and gave it 9 out 10. She's not book crazy so it's nice to have something this length that doesn't become a nag or a chore! More in the series too, which is great. 
 

Under Cover 

Damian’s amazing detective skills are called on when rich boy, Calvin Baggington, has his super-expensive bike stolen at the Green Park Holiday Village. With a brilliant and cunning plan, Damian solves the crime in style – but not before Mum’s blood pressure rises to new heights and the Holiday Village is thrown into chaos. Even Inspector Crockitt, hoping for a peaceful week’s break, becomes unwillingly and painfully involved. 
Barbara Says: 
When I was eight or nine, I used to pretend I was a detective, just like Damian. My friend, Liz, and I used to watch people walking down our street and we would write 'clues' in our notebooks. I don't remember catching any criminals! 
 
Reviews 
 
The kids in my school are lucky. I have bought the series and after reading them all myself, will add them to the library for creasing, tattering and general over-use. 
 

Gruesome Ghosts 

Determined to impress the new girl at school, Damian promises to rid her grandparents of the ghosts that are scaring them witless. When Damian spends the night in their creepy old house, he comes face to face with two gruesome ghosts. But what can he do? 
Barbara Says: 
My friend and I once made up a play about ghosts. We found some white sheets in a cupboard and put them over our heads. Then we acted the play out in the garden. Our friends thought it was really good but my mum was furious when she saw that her sheets were covered in mud. 
 
Reviews 
 
More fun and adventure with this supersleuth. Large print and plenty of illustrations to encourage new readers onto novels. 
 
- Primary Time 
 

Football Forgery 

Damian Drooth, ace detective, stumbles on a new case at the local football ground. Someone is selling forged tickets and it’s up to our hero to find the culprit. After several false starts, the only evidence is a photo taken by a classmate – a girl! Damian realises it’s vital to get that photo if he is to solve the crime. 
Barbara Says: 
When I was eight or nine, I used to pretend I was a detective, just like Damian. My friend, Liz, and I used to watch people walking down our street and we would write 'clues' in our notebooks. I don't remember catching any criminals! 
 
Reviews 
 
When Damian Drooth stumbles on a new case at the local football club he must use all his super-sleuth skills to expose the footie forger and solve the crime. Book nine in this entertaining detective series for younger readers. 
- TBK Mag, Summer 2010 
 
A very good choice for the footie-mad, puzzle-loving young reader. This one will be especially attractive to any young person who has recently learned to tackle books alone.  
- TheBookbag.co.uk 
 
More fun and adventure with this supersleuth. Large print and plenty of illustrations to encourage new readers onto novels.'  
- Primary Times 
 

The Mega Quiz 

When Damian hears about the Mega Quiz and the amazing prize, he’s sure he can win it. But he soon discovers it’s just a money-making scam and sets out to track down the criminal mastermind behind the quiz using just his brain power, some cunning and lots of sweets. 
Barbara Says: 
Damian had to raise money before he could take part in the quiz. Once, when I was seven, I decided to earn some money by putting a table outside my house and tried to sell old comics and broken toys. I sat there all day but nobody bought a thing. 
 
Reviews 
 
More fun and adventure with this supersleuth. Large print and plenty of illustrations to encourage new readers onto novels. 
 
- Primary Times 
 
The Eric series 

Eric and the Striped Horror 

Eric is more sporty than brainy, but a big test is looming. Then his auntie sends him a very strange present: and ugly, stinky, stripy jumper with magical powers. It can turn the wearer into a genius. But will it work for him? 
 
This is the first of the Eric series. Illustrated by Tony Ross. 
Barbara Says: 
After I wrote this book, I asked a lady to knit a jumper just like Eric’s. She was amazing! She didn’t even need a pattern. I take the jumper with me to schools – but I don’t think it has magic powers, unfortunately. 
 

Eric and the Wishing Stone 

Eric is no good at tests and school work. To his horror, Mum asks his teacher, grumpy Mr Hodgetts, to give him extra lessons at home. When a mysterious magic stone arrives from Auntie Rose in South America, he hopes it can grant his biggest wish. 
Barbara Says: 
Oh, how I would like to have a wishing stone. But how would I chose what to wish for? There are so many things… 
 

Eric and the Pimple Potion 

Eric’s spots are multiplying. It seems the problem might be solved when his Auntie Rose sends Mum some magic face cream from South America. Dare he use it? When he decides to take the risk, he soon discovers that the pimple potion has some very unexpected side effects. 
Barbara Says: 
This story goes to show – just when you think you’ve found the solution to a problem – oh dear! It turns out not to be such a perfect solution after all. 
 
Website design by itseeze
Our site uses cookies. For more information, see our cookie policy. Accept cookies and close
Reject cookies Manage settings